28th May, 2009

Chemometrics and Fortune 500 Companies

The other day I was updating my bio for a conference and was working on some sentences regarding our experience teaching chemometrics. It included a reference to teaching employees of Fortune 500 companies. So I decided to try to figure out how many of these companies had sent employees to our courses.

Scanning the list, (and just from memory), I came up with 50+ companies we have either taught in-hours courses for or who have sent people to our open courses, including: 3M Company, Abbott Laboratories, Advanced Micro Devices, Agilent Technologies, Air Products and Chemicals, Alcoa, Amgen, Applied Materials, AT&T, Avery Dennison, Becton, Dickinson & Co., Boston Scientific, Boeing, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Chevron, Colgate-Palmolive, ConocoPhillips, Corning, Delphi, Dow Chemical, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Eastman Chemical, Eastman Kodak, Eli Lilly & Co., ExxonMobil, Ford, General Electric, General Motors, Goodrich, Goodyear Tire & Rubber, Hershey, Hewlett-Packard, Honeywell, Huntsman, Intel, IBM, International Paper, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Lockheed Martin, Lucent, Merck & Co., Micron, Owens Corning, Pfizer, Praxair, Procter & Gamble, Rohm & Haas, Schering-Plough, Sunoco, Texas Instruments, Weyerhaeuser and Wyeth.

First off, I’m pleased that personnel at all of these companies have thought enough of us to come to our courses, (such as EigenU). But beyond that, it shows that chemometrics is an important and widely applicable discipline. In these companies chemometric methods play a critical role in many aspects of their product life cycles, from basic research, through product development and scale-up to manufacturing. Multivariate methods improve efficiency and, therefore, are part of these companies competitive advantage.

BMW

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